Wheat

Last updated August 23, 2012

Note: This information was developed from lecture notes for the Farm and Industry Short Course at the University of Wisconsin.

Importance of Wheat

most widely grown of all cereals

leading world crop

in most areas of the world, wheat is the principle food of mankind

Production

World

grown in all temperate countries and in most sub-tropic countries

also grown at high elevations in some tropic countries

3/4 is winter wheat

Leading countries: acreage (mid 1980's)

RUSSIA - 1/4 of world's acreage 50% of acreage and production - 150 million acres annually world's

CHINA - 90 million acres annually

USA - 70 million acres annually

INDIA - 50+ million acres annually

AUSTRALIA - 20+ million acres annually

CANADA - 20+ million acres annually

TURKEY - 20+ million acres annually

U.S. Acreage and Production

Wheat usually trails corn in cereal production 1986: Corn (grain): 70 million acres Soybeans: 60 million acres Wheat: 58 million acres

About 2/3 of US wheat is winter wheat

1981: 19 states grew > 1 million acres of wheat - 15 of these are west of Mississippi River

Keys to Increased Yield & Profitability

  1. Use improved cultivars
  2. Desirable seeding practices
  3. Establishing tramlines
  4. Fertilizing for high yields
  5. Good pest control: Diseases, weeds, insects
  6. Use of growth regulators to reduce lodging
  7. Timely harvest and storage practices

ICM = Intensive Cereal Management

Use of improved production practices to obtain high yields i.e. Fertilizer, fungicides, growth regulators, etc

Characterized by HIGHER RISKS because COSTS are HIGHER

High level of management is required

Costs/acre will increase, but if COST/BUSHEL decreases, then PROFITS will INCREASE

Tall cultivars are not likely to be as well suited to ICM as shorter cultivars

Semi-dwarfs should be well-suited to ICM systems because they usually have stiff straw

ICM techniques include

  1. Use of improved cultivars
  2. Desirable seeding practices
  3. Establishing tramlines
  4. Fertilizing for high yields
  5. Good pest control: Diseases, weeds, insects
  6. Use of growth regulators to reduce lodging
  7. Timely harvest and storage practices

Further reading

http://www.usask.ca/agriculture/plantsci/winter_wheat/ 


University of Wisconsin, 1575 Linden Drive - Agronomy, Madison WI  53706    (608) 262-1390
If you would like to subscribe (or unsubscribe) to updates during the growing season, click here.
For a list of website updates, click here. Send comments about this website to Joe Lauer.
©  1994-2017 Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin, Division of Cooperative Extension of UWEX.